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Entries Tagged as 'Tim Whitcombe'

Creating a seed bed for a new lawn from seed

March 31st, 2015 · No Comments

Once the area have been dug over or rotovated and the requires sand or organic matter etc added start raking it with a rake in different directs treading with your feet on the larger lumps as you go. Do not be to worried about the levels at this stage, next rake it so you have […]

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Callistemon / bottlebrush care

February 17th, 2015 · No Comments

Plant bottlebrush shrubs in a sunny location. The plants aren’t picky about the soil type as long as it is well drained. If the soil is very poor and wet then enrich with garden compost or well rottd farm yard manure. Once established, bottlebrush plants tolerate drought and moderate salt spray. Callistemon bottlebrush care consists […]

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Building a retaining wall – GardenAdvice tips

February 17th, 2015 · No Comments

Building a retaining wall – the key to building a retaining wall is to retain the soil but not the water. Over 80 percent of the retaining walls that fail through cracking or simple collapse do so because the force and weight of the water in the soil behind the wall pushes against the wall. […]

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Tips for a garden drainage scheme

January 29th, 2015 · No Comments

Tips for a garden drainage scheme • the key to any drainage scheme is to figure out where you can drain the water too, often you can tap into a surface water drain linked to one of your properties drain pipes through a silt trap. Sometimes a soakaway is used but unless your garden drains […]

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How to make comfrey tea

January 23rd, 2015 · No Comments

Liquid fertilisers are a great way to nourish your plants, providing nutrients in a readily available form, so they’re quickly absorbed. There are many chemical fertilisers that will do the job but, by making your own using comfrey leaves, you’ll have a steady supply of organic, nutrient-rich feed at little or no cost. Deep-rooted comfrey […]

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Controlling Wild Garlic in your garden

January 22nd, 2015 · No Comments

Once wild garlic gets established in your flower borders it can be a real problem to control. Digging it up is one option but often works because wild garlic seems to be able to establish itself from the smallest bulb or part of a bulb or root thats left in the soil after digging. Another […]

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Acid loving plants for winter container colour

January 22nd, 2015 · No Comments

A few ideas for winter colour in containers with acid soil/compost loving plants Skimmia japonica ‘Rubella Gaultheria procumbens Pernettya mucronata With some Erica carnea and Erica x darleyensis around the base to add some additional colour

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Moving your plants winter is the best time

January 22nd, 2015 · No Comments

Winter is a good time to move your plants as they are mainly dormant. The keys are plants with more fibrous roots will tend to more a lot easier than plants with larger roots such as found on trees and to move the plant with as much root as possible. Never move or replant in […]

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Two plants that will make your garden more secure

January 12th, 2015 · No Comments

Its seem as unlawful to add razor wire or barbed wire to the top of your garden fences plus its a bit unsightly however with plants no such restriction exist. Two plant that will stop people climbing over your garden fence are pyracantha orange glow and rubus cockburnianus Both have thorns that will truly put […]

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Solving brown patches on conifer hedges

February 4th, 2014 · No Comments

With Brown patches on conifers the brown patches will not grow back unless is a yew which is a form of conifer. The only solution is to prune the brown areas out and plant other plants in front of the brown area to mask the bare areas. Suitable plants include Bamboos and Lonicera Piliata which […]

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Feeding a Argentina Butia

February 3rd, 2014 · No Comments

February is a good time to start in the UK we would suggest a handful of Growmore fertilizer spread around the base of the plant about a metre square in area and then if its dry water it in. Then in later April start feeding with a liquid tomato feed this contains hight levels of […]

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Pruning Gooseberry, Blackcurrant and Blueberry bushes

October 27th, 2013 · No Comments

Gooseberry – In early spring of the first year after planting, select five main stems and prune them back to 15-20cm (6-8in), removing all other stems from the base. Then repeat every 2 years This will keep new stems with lots of fruiting buds coming through Blackcurrant – New canes grow one season and fruit […]

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keep you home grown grapes fresh for xmas

October 24th, 2013 · No Comments

If you have managed to grow some grapes this year as a lot of the GardenAdvice MyGardenTeam members have done its got to the stage now where you have to cut the last bunches before the frosts start. By cutting them with part of the stem attached its possible to place the stem in a […]

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Slugs climbing walls not an uncommon problem

September 10th, 2013 · No Comments

we have a number of requests for advice each year about slugs climbing walls. We have found one of the best methods is to place a copper band 50 mm up from the bottom of the wall to form a barrier this is effective at stopping all but the largest slug and the largest slugs […]

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Moving an established wisteria

August 8th, 2013 · No Comments

If you are re-developing your garden or having some building work carried out then you might not have any choose but to move an established wisteria. Its one of the hardest established plants to move mainly because it has roots that grow very deep and produces very little fibrous or feeding roots which uptake water […]

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Setting up a lawn spreader for an application rate

June 10th, 2013 · No Comments

Many people email the GardenAdvice.co.uk team asking for assistance setting up a lawn spreader with regards to application rates. Firstly you need to look on the side of the box or bag of fertilizer you have and see if it recommends and application rate per square metre or yard. Next using a garage floor or […]

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Storing Bulbs and re-using spring garden bulbs

May 28th, 2013 · No Comments

As the main flower season for bulbs comes to a close its a good idea to take a few simple steps to ensure that you get the best flowering next season. As the bulbs start to die back they make the flower inside the bulb for new year so its a good idea to feed […]

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Reducing privet and yew hedges

April 1st, 2013 · No Comments

Both Privet or yew Hedge can be reduced quite drastically and if care for following the reduction they will recover from dormant buds in the stems. The reduction in the height is achieved by cutting back the hedges to the height required and then cutting back by a further 150 mm this is to allow […]

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Removing moss on your stone walls and paths

April 1st, 2013 · No Comments

The best solution we have found is to use jeyes fluid diluted one cap full per litre of water either sprayed on or from a watering can with a fine rose. Aslo we have in the passed used iron sulphate and powdered sulphur applied directly to the most to renove it. Both treatments take about […]

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Best way to water your plug plants

April 1st, 2013 · No Comments

If you have recently purchased some plug plants one problem you might have come across it that they can be hard to water especially this the plugs become dry or they are a plant such as Begonia rex where ideally you do not want to get the leaves wet when watering. One method we use […]

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