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Has Your Garden Suffered This Winter?

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Have the testing conditions that come with winter wreaked havoc on your garden? If so, you are not alone with numerous gardens up and down the country falling victim to the frost. Spring is a still a little way off but that doesn’t mean that we cannot get a head-start on prepping our gardens for when the sun does finally come out to play.

For those green-fingered among us, we have put together a list of some of the things that you can do to begin the revival of your garden post winter.

Remove Damaged Branches from Trees

In winter, conditions can not only be cold but windy, too. That can cause damage to branches of trees, such as snapping from the seams and general wear and tear. Instead of attempting to persevere with these broken branches, it is far better to completely remove them.

Cut away broken branches just below the damage, allowing for the branch to regrow. Non-urgent repairs can be delayed until the spring is in full swing when flowers are blossoming.

Maintaining the Lawn

If there is any part of the garden that receives more damage than anything else, it’s certainly the lawn. Grass, in the winter, can become yellow with brown patches form on the account of the increase in hydration. Rainfall is good, but too much (which, as we know, is commonplace in the UK) is detrimental.

There are two options that gardeners have to tackle problem lawns. These are:

  1. Fork the soil to help drain away standing water and, depending on the amount of damage caused, re-seed your lawn to help the grass to grow back. Regular cuts once the winter is out of the way will help to keep your lawn looking green and strong.

 

  1. Rip up the lawn and start afresh an artificial lawn. This can be a controversial subject amongst some gardeners, especially traditionalists but, in the modern day, artificial grass is every bit as good as the real thing. Making the transition is a simple one and leaves you with a perfectly green lawn all year round, without having to worry about watering, cutting or re-seeding. It’s not traditional, but it’s certainly easier.

Prudent Planting

If you have winter plants that simply have not kicked into gear then, rather than persevering with dying/dead flowers, cut your losses and get rid. If your winter plants are not blossoming by now, then they never will.

Instead, look ahead to spring and look to replenish your garden’s blossoms now. It may seem a little on the early side to look ahead to warmer weather plants, which is why should look to invest in a greenhouse if you haven’t already got on in your possession. Begin growing spring flowers now and, by the time winter is officially over, they will be looking splendid and ready to add colour to your garden.

Icy/Damaged Patio

Winter not only causes chaos to your garden’s blossoms, but damaged patio can also be as a result of icy conditions. During the winter, the patio is a safety hazard with an accident just waiting to happen. If your garden still sees plenty of traffic in the winter, make sure to grit the patio with salt.

Freeze-thaw causes concrete slabs to weaken and crack becoming unsightly, as well as potentially being unsafe to walk on. Concrete sealer can help to maintain your patio to an extent, although more serious cases of damage will need to be replaced to preserve your garden’s safety.

These are just some of the simple things that you can do to patch up your garden from a long and hard winter, ready to kick it into gear ready for when spring and summer come around.

How to make gardening fun for children

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Gardening can be a fun activity for all of the family to enjoy. As well as being something different for the children to experience, it can also be beneficial for their wellbeing and education. Together with Suttons, an online retailer and gardening expert, we take a look at the benefits of gardening for children and ways to encourage their participation.

Benefits of children gardening

There are many benefits of children spending time in the garden — both from an educational and health perspective.

There is a worrying statistic that three-quarters of UK children spend less time outdoors than prison inmates. Children are becoming more interested in tablets and smartphones and tend to spend more time in the house. Gardening is a great way to get them involved with something different outside.

For younger children, messy play helps to enhance their sensory development. This could involve letting them play with the mud, splash in some puddles and get their hands dirty! It helps your child build their vocabulary too by becoming exposed to plants and creatures that they wouldn’t if they were indoors. Their interest can be captivated with brightly coloured flowers and scented plants.

The research that has been carried out has all shown positive impacts of gardening on children’s behavior and skill development. Some findings include:

  • After participating in a one-year gardening programme as part of their school curriculum, children aged 8-11 showed a significant increase in the ability to work in groups compared to those children who didn’t participate at all.
  • Children who grow their own food are more likely to eat fresh fruits and vegetables or at least express a preference for these foods.
  • Youth interns in community gardens reported increases in maturity and interpersonal skills.
  • Students expressed an increased understanding of ecology and responsibility to care for the environment.

 

Activities to try

There are many different activities to try in the garden. As well as having structured games, it can be good to let your child take the lead on what they want to do in the garden. They might use their own imagination to come up with an activity that you can both get involved in.

For older children, you could create a bird feeder out of a plastic bottle to encourage wildlife into the garden. This is easy enough to do:

  • Create 2 holes opposite each other at the bottom of the bottle, insert a stick through this and this will become a perch
  • Make feeding holes close to the perch (not too big or else the feed will fall out)
  • Create holes in the neck of the bottle, you can pass string through here and hang the bottle from a branch
  • Unscrew the lid and fill with seeds for the birds!

For smaller children, you could take them around the garden and search for clues to which animals have visited. This could be in the form of feathers, tiny tracks or snail trails.

 

Grow their own

As well as playing games and getting crafty, you can also grow plants and vegetables with children. This is a good way for them to get regularly involved in the garden and monitor their own progress.

Trees

Growing a tree is understandably a long-term gardening project, but it can be fun for a child to see how their tree is growing over time.

Easy seeds to grow in the garden are:

  • Conkers. These can be collected from a horse chestnut tree
  • Acorns from an oak tree
  • Helicopters from a sycamore tree

These can all be planted in a pot with soil and compost. It is likely that it will be around spring when the seed sprouts — you may have to transfer it to a bigger pot eventually.

Seeds

Planting seeds with your children that are easy to sow and quick growing are good for keeping their attention and interest levels in the garden. Vegetables such as potatoes, carrots and spring onions are all easy to grow and maintain.

To encourage healthy eating, plant those that they like to eat so they can follow the journey of the seed from planting to their plate!

There are other plants that are fun to grow. Suttons sell vegetable seeds and a range of fun seeds that have been designed for children. These include:

  • Cress — a fast-growing plant that can be grown indoors and outdoors and added to a salad afterwards.
  • Sunflowers — tall growing so children can practise their measuring skills as it grows.
  • A Mimosa Pudica (a dancing plant) that when it is touched, its leaves ‘dance’ and curl up tightly.

The list of activities is endless that you can do with your children in the garden. Get outdoors and get involved with your child and you’ll soon see the benefits!  

Sources

http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/gardening_with_children/

https://www.wyevalegardencentres.co.uk/cms/tips-and-advice/garden-inspiration/gardening-with-children/

http://kidsinthegarden.co.uk/plants-for-kids/growing-vegetables-with-children/

http://www.peecworks.org/peec/peec_reports/01795CA8-001D0211.32/CYE_FactSheet3_Benefits%20of%20Gardening%20for%20Children_August%2020.pdf

http://www.growingschools.org.uk/Resources/Downloads/RHS-Gardening-in-Schools.pdf

http://www.peartreechildcare.co.uk/blog/the-importance-of-messy-and-sensory-play/

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/25/three-quarters-of-uk-children-spend-less-time-outdoors-than-prison-inmates-survey

December Gardening Calendar

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Welcome to the GardenAdvice gardening calendar for the 3rd  week in December 2017

A Happy Christmas and New Year to all our members and viewers
Christmas is all a bit of a rush however well planned your seasonal holidays have been planned and its the same with the garden. Its always a rush in late spring to organise the summer colours in your garden, however some planning and forethought goes a long way. This coming new year, to give you a head start on some summer colour we recommend Bulbs and beyond – premier suppliers of summer colour!

Colourful summer gardens are all about planning – and that’s especially the case with summer bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes such as Lilies, Gladioli, Dahlias, Cannas and Zantedeschias (Calla Lilies). Now is the time to start thinking about planning your summer colour schemes and also pre-ordering your bulbs so you get the best stock available as soon as possible. Bulbs are delivered from March onwards so you’ll receive them at the right planting time. It is important to remember that most summer-flowering bulbs do not tolerate frost so if you have to store them, even for short period of time, do take appropriate measures to protect them from late frost. For summer colours inspiration, visit the GardenAdvice recommended expert supplier Bulbs & beyond
Your bulbs will be delivered to your doorstep direct from Holland so you’ll know they have been stored and treated professionally when you receive them at the right planting time. All you have to do is plant and enjoy them!
If you are a MyGardenTeam member ask your GardenAdvice expert gardener to come up with a few suggestions on summer bulbs, corms, tubers, and rhizomes to add some colour to you garden this summer.

Garden Wildlife – for the wildlife in your garden winter is all about shelter and food. Provide your garden wildlife with these two items and most of the wildlife in your garden will reward you by eating the pests that attack you crops and plants in the spring and summer. Shelter is easy to provide for most wildlife with hedgehogs for example its about making sure they have access under your garden shed or compost heap. Another example of shelter for wildlife is toads, they love upturned clay pots on soft or sandy soil. With your garden birds especially the small one such as blue tits its about leaving a few shrubs slightly over grow or some ivy on a wall to prove them with a place to roost during the hardest days in winter. Food is another mater with birds it easy, just make sure you have a stock of wild bird food in-store and ready to go. With lots of other garden wildlife turning over some of your soil on your veg plot will often turn up a few beetles and other insects plus the odd worm or two to keep wildlife that been hibernating and woken up for a snack going until the spring.

Ponds – leave the cutting down of the foliage from your water plants until the spring as it often provides a source of food for garden wildlife for example bull rush heads are a great source of food for finches.
Its a good idea to place a small blow up plastic football in your the pool or pond. This will stop the water freezing totally in a hard frost . The water around the football will not freeze it leaving just a patch of clear water which helps stop the ice damaging the pond and allows fish and other garden wildlife access to clear water in big freezes.

Compost heaps – to keep your compost heaps of bins working during the winter its a good idea to cover or wrap them with carpet. This will hold the heat in the compost and helps keep the bacteria and fungi active break down the compost

Planting
It might be cold and windy at this time of year but now is the ideal time to carry out any hardy plant planting in your garden with such items as trees, shrubs and perennial plants.  At the time of year although the air is cold often the soil is still warm enough to promote new root growth on newly planted hardy plants

Root balled plants – As the winter planting season gets under-way get some advice on root balled plants.
When you are buying evergreen root balled plants in the autumn and winter often a nursery will grow a number of plants and buy in root balled plants from abroad so ask if its a locally grown plant or if they have been brought in. The advantage being that locally grown plants are already used to your conditions, if they have been grown in the South of Italy they are in for a bit of a shock. More

Time to look at your stored crops of apples and pears.
The Xmas and New Year is a good time to check on any apples and pears you have in storage. Make sure they are not touching each other and any signs of brushing or discolouring remove them before the effect the whole crop. You will have heard the saying one rotten apple will spoil a barrel

Beech trees and Hedges
The Christmas and new year period is you last chance to plant a bare root beech hedge – for reasons not fully understood planting them from January onwards and they never seem to do so well as the one planted at or before Christmas and new year period.

Glasshouse
The seasonal holidays are a great time to clean out your glasshouse and get it ready for the seed sowing in February / March in a heated glasshouse. Wash down all the pots, seed trays, staging and other structures with a mixture of Jeyes fluid and water, the idea being it will kill all the overwintering pest eggs and fungal spores. Then start on the glass making sure you remove all the moss etc. where the pains overlap.

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GardenAdvice Members Page
Keep up to date with the latest offer for GardenAdvice and MyGardenTeam members Follow this link for more details  http://gardenadvice.co.uk/club/members/index.html

GardenAdvice one day gardening course for beginners designed to get you started in your own garden or makes an ideal christmas gift for the gardener in your life.
For further details Click Here

How banning one type of weedkiller could transform the food and farming industries

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Despite it being an extremely popular and effective weedkiller used for many decades, we will soon no longer be able to buy glyphosate. While this is a nuisance for keen gardeners who like to keep their homegrown produce and lawns free from weeds, it also has an even greater impact on food prices, farming and even transport!
Read on to find out why the weedkiller was banned and how it could affect us in the future.

What’s the story of glyphosate?
Unless you really know your weedkillers, chances are you won’t have heard much about glyphosate. In fact, the herbicide is the most widely-bought weedkiller in the world and has actually been around since 1974 when it was brought out by Monsanto. Originally called ‘Roundup’, it fast became an important product for farmers to help kill weeds and boost productivity. Due to it being commonly sold, glyphosate-based formulations are now also used in: agriculture, forestry, aquatic environments, streets, parks, and schools.

The ban and the EU
The decision to outlaw glyphosate came from the European Parliament in October 2017, which has stated that the substance will be phased out by mid-December 2022. For many years, scientists have warned people against glyphosate, however, it’s taken a two-year debate for the European Parliament to vote 355 to 204 in favour of its ban. Now, measures must be adopted to phase out the use of glyphosate across the entire EU. However, it’s worth remembering that this was a non-binding vote. Members of the European Union and European Commission are now obligated to stop the use of glyphosate on farms, in public parks, and in households whenever other biological pest control systems are available.

How important is glyphosate?
Glyphosate is widely-used in the UK, which makes its ban all the more important for the economy. According to research from the Soil Association, the use of glyphosate in UK farming has increased by 400% over the past 20 years. The Guardian has also reported that there has almost been enough of the herbicide sprayed since its creation that it would cover every cultivable acre of Earth. Recently, glyphosate was discovered in: crisps, bread, biscuits, cereals and crackers.

Problems of glyphosate
Banning glyphosate came about as a response to the discovery of it in various food products, which highlighted it as a potential threat. Fears have long been raised that the herbicide is a hormone disrupter that is linked to birth defects, the development of cancerous tumours and other developmental disorders. Some scientists have also argued that there is no safe lower level for human consumption.

How the ban of glyphosate could the food costs
Of course, it’s vital that we strive to deliver only safe, quality food to our supermarket shelves. However, banning glyphosate could cause negative effects that many haven’t considered. Monsanto’s vice president, Scott Partridge, stated to The Guardian: “You would see increased costs for farming and decreased productivity, increased greenhouse gas emissions, loss of topsoil, and loss of moisture. Farmers through Europe would be very upset that a very effective and safe tool had been taken out of their hands.”
Agreeing with Partridge is a Polish orchard farmer with experience of using glyphosate who commentated on Monsanto’s companion site Growing Our Future: “Production costs of fruit farming will definitely go up as we look to use more time and energy consuming methods of weed control. When production costs go up, prices in shops also go up and people should be aware of this. For fruit farmers, there is no alternative to glyphosate because there are no other products that do what it does.”

How the ban of glyphosate could affect train lines
What about other industries? On top of the ramifications on the food and farming industries, the prohibition of glyphosate is likely to impact negatively on businesses that clear rail tracks. Weeds that are left unchecked can significantly restrict track visibility, track access for workers and possibly even render a line impassable in severe cases across Europe’s railways.
How do companies currently make the tracks clear and safe? Specialist operator, Weedfree on Track has been combatting weed problems for over half a century via a method of using a “weed killer train”, which sprays a glyphosate solution onto areas that have been identified by a high-tech camera as having weeds with a specific amount of chlorophyll content. Jonathan Caine, operations manager at Weedfree on Track, said: “We’ve carried out a number of trials to see how much more effective the train is than manual methods and have estimated that manually doing the same job, in the same time frame, can cost up to 40 times more.”
Alongside this issue, we must also find or create a solution that’s equally as effective as glyphosate. Jean-Pierre Deforet, a chemist at Belgian railway authority Infrabel, said in a Growing Our Future article: “The alternatives are to use mulch or to spray manually. But allowing people onto the tracks would cause another, bigger safety issue than spraying from the train.”
This article was created by Lycetts — a crop insurance supplier and financial services provider.

Additional sources:
http://www.breastcanceruk.org.uk/science-and-research/glyphosate/

https://www.soilassociation.org/our-campaigns/not-in-our-bread/what-is-glyphosate/

https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-eu-health-glyphosate/eu-lawmakers-demand-five-year-phase-out-of-weedkiller-glyphosate-idUKKBN1CT21H

Gardening course gift for your partner this Christmas

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe


If you are looking for a great Christmas gift a partner that’s keen on gardening or wishing to improve your garden a one day gardening course from GardenAdvice could be the ideal gift. Issued as a gift certificate that can be used on a one day course at a number of venues and dates throughout the UK or as a home course – we come to you for the day and carry out the course in your garden. For Further details Click Here

Gardening courses as a Christmas Gift

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

GardenAdvice one day courses make a great Christmas gift for a partner that loves gardening. Its the gift that lasts a full 12 months providing GardenAdvice advice and gardening expertise’s

 

Course available at local venues or in your own garden – we come to you and carry out the course in your own garden for you or you and upto 12 of your friends

 

If you are new to gardening it’s difficult to understand where to start with all the Latin plant names, different types of soils and different species of plants needing a range of growing conditions and environments. In response to this need and with feedback from our members and viewers the GardenAdvice Team have created a number of gardening courses especially created for the new gardener. The aim of our gardening courses is to provide you with a basic knowledge of gardening to get you started and provide you with ongoing advice from your own gardening expert for a full year through the Gardenadvice MyGardenTeam system, every course we provide comes with 12 months membership to our MyGardenTeam service

 

 

Gardening course for beginners and new gardeners. Click Here

The GardenAdvice one day gardening course for beginners and new gardeners is on the 17th March 2018 at kew village/kew gardens London – ring us or send us an email for more details

The GardenAdvice one day gardening course for beginners and new gardeners is on the 31st March 2018 at kew village/kew gardens London – ring us or send us an email for more details

The GardenAdvice one day gardening course for beginners and new gardeners is on the 14th April 2018 at kew village/kew gardens London – ring us or send us an email for more details

 

Gardening course for beginners for vegetable growing. Click here

Gardening course for Wildlife gardening. Click here

 

For further details on our gardening courses telephone 01225 637218 or email us at courses@gardenadvice.co.uk

 

All the GardenAdvice courses are available in the following formats.

Home course for a day in your own garden for you and you and your friends for up to 12 people. One of our GardenAdvice garden advisors comes to you and carries out the course costing £145 per day. We tailor the course to your gardeing interests and the person organising the course gets 12 months membership to our MyGardenTeam service included in the cost. Available to purchase as a gift voucher as a xmas or birthday etc

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One day gardening course in a GardenAdvice garden around the UK see our gardening course facebook page for more details costing £145 per person including lunch and membership to our MyGardenTeam service. Available to purchase as a gift voucher as a xmas or birthday etc.

 

One to three day residential gardening courses held in our main UK garden 5 miles North of Dorchester, Dorset see our gardening course facebook page for more details costing £160 per person per day including bed and breakfast plus lunch for you and your non gardening partner. Discounts available for single people attending our residential gardening course and two people both attending one of our residential courses sharing a room. Includes membership to our MyGardenTeam service. Available to purchase as a gift voucher as a xmas or birthday etc.

 

For further information on the Gardenadvice gardening courses including dates and venues please visit our gardening course facebook page by Click here

Gardening course for beginners

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Gardening courses created for beginners and new gardeners.


Become a gardener in 2018 with a GardenAdvice Gardening Course – great Xmas present for the gardener in your life from GardenAdvice.co.uk 

Course available at local venues or in your own garden – we come to you and carry out the course in your own garden for you or you and up to 12 of your friends

If you are new to gardening it’s difficult to understand where to start with all the Latin plant names, different types of soils and different species of plants needing a range of growing conditions and environments. In response to this need and with feedback from our members and viewers the GardenAdvice Team have created a number of gardening courses especially created for the new gardener.

The aim of our gardening courses is to provide you with a basic knowledge of gardening to get you started and provide you with ongoing advice from your own gardening expert for a full year through the Gardenadvice MyGardenTeam system, every course we provide comes with 12 months membership to our MyGardenTeam service

Gardening course for beginners and new gardeners.
Click Here 

The GardenAdvice one day gardening course for beginners and new gardeners is on the 17th March 2018 at kew village/kew gardens London – ring us or send us an email for more details. Click here

For further details on our gardening courses telephone 01225 637218 or email us at courses@gardenadvice.co.uk
All the GardenAdvice courses are available in the following formats.
Home course for a day in your own garden for you and you and your friends for up to 12 people. One of our GardenAdvice garden advisors comes to you and carries out the course costing £145 per day. We tailor the course to your gardening interests and the person organizing the course gets 12 months membership to our MyGardenTeam service included in the cost.

Available to purchase as a gift voucher as a Xmas or birthday etc
.
One day gardening course in a GardenAdvice garden around the UK see our gardening course Facebook page for more details

Companion planting: Which vegetables are compatible?

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Companion planting has been practised for over 8,000 years and was a method used originally by the native Americans. It works by creating a complex root system below the soil that helps to bring nutrients to the surface.However, many modern-day gardeners are afraid to try the technique in fear of ruining their harvest. Suttons Seeds, retailers of vegetable seeds and experts in gardening, has compiled a list of popular fruit and vegetables to grow at home and what they should be planted next to.

So, if you’re wondering whether your carrots can be potted next to the broccoli or your beetroots next to the cabbage, read the infographic below…

Companion planting has been practised for over 8,000 years and was a method used originally by the native Americans. It works by creating a complex root system below the soil that helps to bring nutrients to the surface.

However, many modern-day gardeners are afraid to try the technique in fear of ruining their harvest. Suttons Seeds, retailers of vegetable seeds and experts in gardening, has compiled a list of popular fruit and vegetables to grow at home and what they should be planted next to.

So, if you’re wondering whether your carrots can be potted next to the broccoli or your beetroots next to the cabbage, read the infographic below…

Getting rid of Japanese knotweed

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Japanese knotweed: two words no gardener ever wants to hear — especially when it’s connected with their own glorious patch of green. You only have to open a newspaper or turn on the TV to see another case of a garden and property being overcome by this fast-growing pest that can be incredibly difficult to eradicate.

 

Before we get to how to best get rid of this imported scourge, a bit of history. How did this exotic Japanese knotweed end up in the UK in the first place? To answer that, we have to lay the blame firmly at the feet of a German man — and a botanist at that. Philipp Franz Balthasar von Siebold thought Japanese knotweed was a pretty little plant and would go down well among plant-lovers in the UK. So, in the 1840s, he brought it here. Indeed, the public lapped it up — members of elite high society and botanical gardens, at least.

 

The love affair with this dainty-leaved, tear-shaped plant was fleeting, however, and soon people grew tired of it and threw it away. This marked the beginning of Japanese knotweed’s seemingly unstoppable spread right around the UK, with invasions particularly concentrated in the southeast of England and parts of Wales. We’ve been trying to get rid of it ever since.

 

Japanese Knotweed: DIY or the Pros?

 

Now that we know how this giant and growing mess came about in our country, it’s time to look at ways of properly treating it, so that it doesn’t grow back. The big question, one that every gardener affected with this dastardly problem wants to ask, is: can you deal with Japanese knotweed yourself, or is it a job for the experts?

 

Part of the answer lies in how extensive the weed’s growth is in a garden or elsewhere on a property. Simply slashing back the branches and hoping for the best is not going to work, however, as like most tenacious weeds (think nettles and thistles), it will quickly shoot back up and start growing all over again. Bear in mind that this is one rapid grower. During its peak growing season in the summer, it can expand by up to 20cm in a day. That’s a lot of plant to deal with.

 

It’s safe to say that most gardeners find it an entirely frustrating experience when trying to eradicate Japanese knotweed themselves. The plant’s extensive root system can be just too entrenched and complicated to exterminate, which is where the problem really lies. Even if you dig up the roots, some parts of it will surely remain in the ground and soon start sending up new shoots.

 

A Task for the Experts

 

Japanese knotweed removal is best left to those who know what they’re doing. Experienced Japanese knotweed eradication firms will use herbicide treatments or dig-out methods to ensure nothing is left. The best ones will provide an insurance-backed guarantee that it won’t come back — and, if it does, there will be no further cost for additional extermination work.

 

Many gardeners will naturally be worried about the Japanese knotweed removal cost and it’s certainly a valid one. But consider that, if left untreated, Japanese knotweed can cause significant damage and loss in value to a property, as the root network becomes ever more extensive. Also, there are legal ramifications if it spreads onto a neighbouring property or land.

 

It’s not illegal to have Japanese knotweed on your own property, but you’ll almost certainly encounter difficulties if you want to sell it. A new survey shows that most people would walk away from a property they were considering buying if they knew there was Japanese knotweed growing somewhere on it. Not only that, but mortgage providers will not approve a mortgage unless the problem is professionally dealt with and there’s a solid guarantee in place.

 

With Japanese knotweed in your garden, it’s best to leave it to those with experience and keep your hands clean. Call in the pros.

 

Recycling in the garden

In CategoryTim Whitcombe
ByGardenAdvice Tim Whitcombe

Recycling in the garden not only makes environmental sense it often makes economic sense as well. With the cost of removing old materials such as paving slabs and old concrete bases recycling makes good sense. The GardenAdvice Team when helping to develop a garden have a strong focus on recycling materials from gardens using a range of methods such as 

  • Shredding and chipping plant prunings for use on site as a mulch or to start a compost heap
  • Crushing old concrete for use in new patio and path bases
  • Using the internet to offer free clean hardcore to other parties for use in building and construction projects
  • Storing and recycling stone onto other garden developments in walls and alpine gardens

It’s not possible to recycle everything in a garden and you will often have to hire waste skips etc however by hiring a firms such as this which are committed to recycling and being as Eco-friendly as possible it’s possible to extend your recycling efforts